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Bhagavad-Gita

The essence of Vedic knowledge

"When I read the Bhagavad-Gita and reflect about how God created this universe everything else seems so superfluous." ~ Albert Einstein

"When doubts haunt me, when disappointments stare me in the face, and I see not one ray of hope on the horizon, I turn to Bhagavad-gita and find a verse to comfort me; and I immediately begin to smile in the midst of overwhelming sorrow. Those who meditate on the Gita will derive fresh joy and new meanings from it every day." ~ Mahatma Gandhi 

Bhagavad Gita Quotes

  • Action.  Action is greater than inaction. Perform therefore thy task in life. Even the life of the body could not be if there were no action.

  • Altruism.  That one I love who is incapable of ill will, and returns love for hatred. Living beyond the reach of I and mind, and of pain and pleasure, full of mercy, contented, self-controlled, with all his heart and all his mind given to Me with such a one I am in love.

  • Beliefs. Man is made by his belief. As he believes, so he is.

  • Detachment. Better indeed is knowledge than mechanical practice. Better than knowledge is meditation. But better still is surrender of attachment to results, because there follows immediate peace.

  • Disarray.  The disunited mind is far from wise; how can it meditate? How be at peace? When you know no peace, how can you know joy?

  • Doubts.  Neither in this world nor elsewhere is there any happiness in store for him who always doubts.

  • Failure.  On this path effort never goes to waste, and there is no failure. Even a little effort toward spiritual awareness will protect you from the greatest fear.

  • Love. Still your mind in me, still yourself in me, and without a doubt you shall be united with me, Lord of Love, dwelling in your heart.

  • Meditation.  When meditation is mastered, the mind is unwavering like the flame of a lamp in a windless place.

  • Restlessness.  The mind is restless and difficult to restrain, but it is subdued by practice.

 

 More Bhagavad-Gita Quotes

About Bhagavad Gita

Bhagavad-gita is also known as Gitopanishad or Gita, is a Sanatana Dharma or Hindu scripture produced from the colloquy given by Sri Krishna to Arjuna during the Kurukshetra War. Its philosophies and insights are intended to reach beyond the scope of religion and to humanity as a whole. In a very clear and wonderful way the Supreme Lord Krishna describes the science of self-realization and the exact process by which a human being can establish their eternal relationship with God.

 

 

 

The Bhagavad Gita is considered among the most important texts in the history of literature and philosophy. It is the essence of Vedic knowledge and one of the most important Upanishads in Vedic literature. The Bhagavad Gita is revered as sacred by the majority of Hindu traditions, and especially so by followers of Krishna. It is at times referred to as the "manual for mankind" and has been highly praised by not only Indians but also by Western great thinkers.

The Bhagavad Gita comprises exactly 700 verses, and is a part of the Mahabharata. The verses, using the range and style of Sanskrit meter (chandas) with similes and metaphors, are very poetic; hence the title, which translates to "the Song of the Divine One", of Bhagavan in the form of Krishna.

The teacher of the Bhagavad Gita is Lord Krishna, who is revered by Hindus as a manifestation of God (Parabrahman) Himself, and is referred to within as Bhagavan, the Divine One.

The context of the Gita is a conversation between Lord Krishna and the Pandava prince Arjuna taking place on the battlefield before the start of the Kurukshetra War. Responding to Arjuna's confusion and moral dilemma about fighting his own cousins, Lord Krishna explains to Arjuna his duties as a warrior and prince, and elaborates on different Yogic and Vedantic philosophies, with examples and analogies. This has led to the Gita often being described as a concise guide to Hindu theology and also as a practical, self-contained guide to life. During the discourse, Lord Krishna reveals His identity as the Supreme Being Himself (Svayam Bhagavan), blessing Arjuna with an awe-inspiring vision of His divine universal form.

The Bhagavad Gita is also called Gītopaniṣad, implying its having the status of an Upanishad, i.e. a Vedantic scripture. As it is taken to represent a summary of the Upanishadic teachings, it is also called "the Upanishad of the Upanishads". Another title is mokṣaśāstra, or "Scripture of Liberation".

The Essence of Bhagavad-Gita

The Bhagavad-Gita teaches you how to live in this world of illusion, find your true nature and purpose, and do your duty by remaining amidst the routines of life and facing them squarely with a sense of fearlessness, detachment and stability of mind.

Krishna first explains the samsaric cycle of birth and death. There is no true death of the soul simply a sloughing of the body at the end of each round of birth and death. The purpose of this cycle is to allow a person to work off their karma, accumulated through lifetimes of action. If a person completes action selflessly, in service to God, then they can work off their karma, eventually leading to a dissolution of the soul, the achievement of enlightenment and vijnana, and an end to the samsaric cycle. If they act selfishly, then they keep accumulating debt, putting them further and further into karmic debt.

The three main concepts for achieving this dissolution of the soul are renunciation, selfless service, and meditation. All three are elements for achieving 'yoga,' or skill in action. The truly divine human does not renounce all worldly possessions or simply give up action, but rather finds peace in completing action in the highest service to God. As a result, a person must avoid the respective traps of the three gunas: rajas (anger, ego), tamas (ignorance, darkness), and saatva (harmony, purity).

The highest form of meditation comes when a person not only can free themselves from selfish action, but also focus entirely on the divine in their actions. He who achieves divine union with God in meditation will ultimately find freedom from the endless cycle of rebirth and death. He who truly finds union with God will find him even at the moment of death.